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Fatigue Management: Work and Rest Requirements

Fatigue Management: Work and Rest Requirement

Generally, all drivers of fatigue-regulated heavy vehicles must comply with certain maximum work and minimum rest periods. Parties involved in the supply chain must take acceptable procedures in preventing drivers to exceed these set limits. This is similar to occupational health and safety laws that means all drivers must be allowed to stop if they are to go beyond the limits and make alternative arrangements.

The Heavy Vehicle National Law has set three work and rest conditions:

  1. Standard Hours

    These are the work and rest hours that are allowed in the HVNL for all drivers who are not operating under National Vehicle Accreditation Scheme accreditation or an exemption. Standard hours are the maximum amount of work and minimum amount of rest possible without the need of additional safety countermeasures.Standard Hours – Work and Rest Requirements – for solo drivers

 

Time Work Rest
In any period of… A driver must not work for more than a maximum  of… And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of…
5 ½ hours 5 ¼ hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
8 hours 7 ½ hours work time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
11 hours 10 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
24 hours 12 hours work time 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*
7 days 72 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time
14 days 144 hours work time 2 x night rest breaks# and 2 x night rest breaks taken on consecutive days

*Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary heavy vehicle.  #Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10pm on a day and 8am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.

 

The below table applies to solo drivers in the bus and coach sector only.

Time Work Rest
In any period of… A driver must not work for more than a maximum of… And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of…
5 1/2 hours 5 1/4 hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
8 hours 7 1/2 hours work time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
11 hours 10 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
24 hours 12 hours work time 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*
7 days 6 x night rest breaks#
28 days 288 hours work time 4 x 24 hours continuous hours stationary rest time

*Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary heavy vehicle. #Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10pm on a day and 8am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.

The below table applies to two-up drivers.

Time Work Rest
In any period of… A driver must not work for more than a maximum of… And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of…
5 1/2 hours 5 1/4 hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
8 hours 7 1/2 hours work time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
11 hours 10 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
24 hours 12 hours work time 5 continuous hours stationary rest time* or 5 hours continuous rest time in an approved sleeper berth while the vehicle   is moving
52 hours 10 continuous hours stationary rest time
7 days 60 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time and 24 hours stationary rest time in blocks of at least 7 continuous hours of stationary rest time
14 days 120 hours work time 2 x night rest breaks#and 2 x night rest breaks taken on consecutive days

*Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary heavy vehicle.#Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10pm on a day and 8am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.

 

  1. Basic Fatigue Management

    Drivers that are operating under NHVAS with Basic Fatigue Management accreditation can work under more flexible work and rest hours. This allows drivers to work up to 14 hours in a 24-hour period. Basic Fatigue Management gives operators greater say when drivers can work and rest given that the risks of driver fatigue is properly managed.

 

The below table applies to solo drivers.

Time Work Rest
In any period of… A driver must not work for more than a maximum of… And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of…
6 ¼ hours 6 hours work time 15 continuous minutes rest time
9 hours 8 1/2 hours work time 30 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
12 hours 11 hours work time 60 minutes rest time in blocks of 15 continuous minutes
24 hours 14 hours work time 7 continuous hours stationary rest time*
7 days 36 hours long/night work time** No limit has been set
14 days 144 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time taken after no more than 84 hours work time and 24 continuous hours stationary rest time and 2 x night rest breaks# and 2 x night rest breaks taken on consecutive days.

*Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a regulated heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary regulated heavy vehicle.
**Long/night work time is any work time in excess of 12 hours in a 24 hour period or any work time between midnight and 6 am (or the equivalent hours in the time zone of the base of a driver).
#Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10pm on a day and 8am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.

Download the BFM daily work and rest hours planner for solo drivers.

The below table applies to two-up drivers.

Time Work Rest
In any period of… A driver must not work for more than a maximum of… And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum rest break of…
24 hours 14 hours work time  No limit has been set
82 hours  No limit has been set 10 continuous hours stationary rest time
7 days 70 hours work time 24 continuous hours stationary rest time and 24 hours stationary rest time in blocks of at least 7 continuous hours of stationary rest time
14 days 140 hours work time 4 night rest breaks#

*Stationary rest time is the time a driver spends out of a regulated heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth of a stationary regulated heavy vehicle.
#Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between the hours of 10pm on a day and 8am on the next day (using the time zone of the base of the driver) or a 24 continuous hours stationary rest break.

BFM Standards

There are six fatigue management standards that you need to comply with for BFM.

  1. Scheduling and rostering – scheduling of individual trips and rostering of drivers are to be in accordance with limits prescribed in legislation
  1. Fitness for duty – drivers are in a fit state to safely perform required duties and meet the specified medical requirements
  1. Fatigue knowledge and awareness – personnel involved in the management, operation, administration, participation and verification of the BFM option can demonstrate competency in fatigue knowledge relevant to their position on the causes, effects and management of fatigue and the operator’s fatigue management system
  1. Responsibilities – the authorisations, responsibilities and duties of all positions involved in the management, operation, administration, participation and verification of their operations under the BFM option are current, clearly defined, documented and carried out accordingly
  1. Internal review – an internal review system is implemented to identify non-compliances and verify that the activities comply with the BFM standards and the operator’s fatigue management system
  1. Records and documentation – the operator will implement, authorise, maintain and review documented policies and procedures that ensure the management, performance and verification of the BFM option in accordance with the standards.

 

  1. Advanced Fatigue Management

    To those who are operating under NHVAS with Advanced Fatigue Management accreditation adopts a genuine risk management approach in managing heavy vehicle driver fatigue. Instead of prescribing work and rest hours, Advanced Fatigue Management offers more flexibility than hours of Basic Fatigue Management in return, the operator demonstrates a greater accountability in managing their drivers’ risks caused by fatigue.

Risk Classification System

The NHVR assesses proposed AFM work and rest arrangements under a Risk Classification System (RCS). RCS helps review the levels of fatigue risk that is associated with combinations of work, sleep and rest. RCS is based on fatigue science and research. With it, it enables operators to submit work schedules with higher risk potentials (such as longer or frequent shifts) that are eased by offsetting key fatigue management principles (for example, increased work related breaks). The Risk Classification System Tool is utilised by the NHVR when assessing an AFM application and gives transparency on application decisions.

How the AFM Application Process and RCS Work

Applicants for AFM will determine their fatigue risk profile for common work schedules against a preset fatigue management principles.

A risk potential rank from baseline to high is set for each principle. By using the Risk Classification tool, you can see the risk potential ranking for any particular work schedule and can come up for a profile for your entire schedule. This information should be used in deciding what available countermeasures are there in your fatigue management system. The fatigue management system also must comply with the 10 AFM standards and must contain countermeasures to safely manage the fatigue risks.

If you are to propose multiple high or medium risk potentials, you may have to prepare a safety case that portrays how the fatigue risks are managed by the business practices as described in your fatigue management system. There is also an open option to amend your work tasks in case that work circumstances change.

Seven Fatigue Principles

The prinicples are grouped into 3 main categories:

  1. Work-related rest breaks
a. Reduce the time spent continuously working in the work opportunity
b. The more frequent the rest breaks away from driving, the better
  1. Recovery breaks
c. Ensuring adequate sleep opportunity in order to obtain sufficient sleep
d. Maximise adequate night sleep
e. Minimise shifts ending between 00:00 – 06:00
f. Minimise extended shifts
  1. Reset breaks (such as long periods of rest or extended leave)
g. Prevent accumulation of fatigue with reset breaks of at least 30 hours (and include two nigh periods, 00:00 – 06:00) between work sequences

 

Ten AFM Standards

There are ten fatigue management standards that you need to comply with for AFM.

  1. Scheduling and rostering – scheduling of trips and rostering of drivers must incorporate fatigue management measures.
  1. Readiness for duty – drivers are in a fit state to safely perform required duties.
  1. Fatigue knowledge and awareness – all personnel involved in the management, operation, administration, participation and verification of the AFM option can demonstrate competency in fatigue knowledge relevant to their position on the causes, effects and management of fatigue and the operator’s fatigue management system.
  1. Responsibilities – the authorisations, responsibilities and duties of all positions involved in the management, operation, administration, participation and verification of their operations under the AFM option are current, clearly defined and documented and carried out accordingly.
  1. Internal review – an internal review system is implemented to identify non-compliances and verify that the activities comply with the AFM Standards and the operator’s fatigue management system.
  1. Records and documentation – the operator will implement, authorise, maintain and review documented policies and procedures that ensure the effective management, performance and verification of the AFM option in accordance with the standards. Records that demonstrated the compliant operation of the AFM option are collected, stored and maintained to verify compliance.
  1. Health – drivers are to participate in a health management system to identify and manage fatigue risks.
  1. Workplace conditions – workplace environments and conditions must assist in the prevention of fatigue.
  1. Management practices – management practices are to minimise the risks relating to driver fatigue.
  1. Operating limits – operating limits will provide drivers and operators with the flexibility to effectively manage fatigue.

 

Pre-existing AFM accreditation

Operators who had pre-existing AFM accreditation on 10 February 2014 (prior to implementation of the RCS) are not required to re-apply for AFM until their current approval ends. At this time, operators will be able to transition their accreditation to the RCS.

If an operator’s previous AFM system is considered incompatible with the RCS, they can elect to have their current AFM system reapproved, if they agree to work with the NHVR to transition their current system to work under the RCS.

Transport ministers have set a timeframe for this transition period. AFM accreditation approved under this arrangement will end on the 31 December 2015. The NHVR is committed to working through all issues so that current AFM participants have a smooth transition to the new arrangements, and has begun working closely with those affected.

 

What are Fatigue Management Exemptions?

What are Fatigue Management Exemptions? | Burleigh Driver Training
Fatigue management exemptions are permits and notices that allows drivers and operators to apply for work and rest hours, work diary and record keeping exemptions – If found that they are not able to abide the legislated fatigue management requirements.

With these opportunities both drivers and operators under the fatigue management exemptions can use alternative methods on how to comply to the objectives of the NHVR, while also maintaining a high level of road safety.

All applicants must provide all the supporting information requested when they are about to submit their application. NHVR has a strict protocol in concern with the fatigue management exemption.

If you’d like to apply for the fatigue management exemptions, here are the guides of the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator.

1. Work and Rest Hours

Both drivers and operators of fatigue-related heavy vehicles can be provided with work and rest hours’ exemptions if they are looking to maximize their work times and minimize their rest times as prescribed by the Heavy Vehicle National Law.All applicants are required to show that Advanced Fatigue Management or Basic Fatigue Management are not appropriate and that the proposed limits are safe.

Safety cases are needed in the application process. This allows NHVR (National Heavy Vehicle Regulator) to assess that the proposed alternative work and rest hours are fully supported by a demanding fatigue management safety system that includes risk analysis and mitigation plans.

All applications are assessed by the NHVR in determining fatigue risk levels and if the appropriate safety management systems are functioning and in order. In the process of the proposed safety countermeasures, Fatigue Expert Reference Group (FERG) helps the NHVR.

2. Fatigue Record Keeping Exemption

In order to help drivers achieve their obligations to manage driver fatigue, meeting chain of responsibilities, and ensure and monitor driver activities,  the NHVR sets out several record keeping obligations on record keepers for the fatigue-regulated heavy vehicles.

In the case that record keeping can become extremely difficult to comply with or can result with multiple systems of keeping records (for different legislative obligations), operators can apply for a permit that exempts them from recording fatigue from the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator (NHVR).

In order to apply for a fatigue record exemption permit, you are required to submit an establish work diary or a record keeping exemption permit to the NHVR. The application should include the operator’s details, description of the proposed record keeping arrangements and a list of drivers that contains names and details who would be working under the record keeping exemption if the permit is granted.

3. Work Diary Exemption 

There will be special circumstances that drivers may have literacy and print media impairment which makes it a challenge for them to use their National Driver Work Diary. In these circumstances, drivers or in some cases, operators that are acting in their behalf, may apply to the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator for a permit on work diary exemption. This certain exemption allows drivers to nominate other ways to record their work and rest details. These details can then be transcribed by a person the driver would nominate. This work diary exemption permit must be carried by the driver at all times.

The application of work diary or record keeping exemption must include a letter from a competent person detailing the reason why the driver is applying for this permit – level of literacy skills and print media impairment, example. The competent person can be:

  • A speech pathologist

  • A psychologist

  • A Literacy, language and numeracy practitioner

  • A doctor

A person who is qualified and able to assess the driver’s English literacy

The application form includes:

  • Time frame you want for the exemption

  • Name of the driver

  • Exemption conditions (alternative methods of keeping records and transcribing it into a work diary)

  • Name of the nominated person (a person who agrees to transcribe the work diary on the driver’s behalf)

If the exemption or permit is granted, the nominated person to record is required legally to make the written work records of the driver. The NHVR then would then contact the nominated person to confirm that they are aware of their obligations and responsibility for filling in a work diary on behalf of the driver.

Want to be notified when the next part in this series is available and other related posts?  Follow us on our Facebook page for more news https://www.facebook.com/BurleighDriverTrainingSchool/ or contact us through phone (07) 5527 3719.

 

 

5 Ways to Stay Awake When Driving

Ways to Stay Awake When Driving

Surviving the Drive a Guide to Fatigue Management

This is the initial post in a 5-part blog series on road safety in the transport industry. We take a deeper look on the issues of fatigue management and its laws. Continue reading to know more about fatigue management and why it is important to be aware by its laws.

 

What is fatigue?

Fatigue refers to one’s physical and mental exhaustion that stops that person from functioning normally. In the first part of the series we are going to introduce fatigue management and tips on how to overcome it.

 

Driver fatigue or drowsy driving is one of the root causes of road accidents. Its main causes are not enough sleep, driving at night (when you should be asleep) and working or being awake all day long. Drowsy driving can be prevented in many ways, self-discipline is your number one key to a successful long drive.

 

National heavy vehicle driver fatigue laws apply to fatigue -regulated heavy vehicles. Fatigue management laws were created to help and protect drivers and their passengers to have a safety trip ahead. Here is the list to identify if your vehicle falls under the fatigue-regulated heavy vehicles:

  • Gross Vehicle Mass (GVM) of more than 12t
  • Combination when the aggregate of the GVM is more than 12t
  • Buses with a GVM more than 4.5t fitted to convey more than 12 grown-ups
  • A truck, or a mix including a truck, with a GVM of more than 12t with a machine or actualize joined.

 

In some cases, heavy vehicles are not classified as a fatigue-regulated heavy vehicle. This includes trams, motor vehicles modified to primarily operate as a machine, bulldozers, tractors and motorhomes used for residential purposes.

 

The laws cover all parts of work and rest relating to this list:

 

  • Work and rest hours
  • Recording work and rest times
  • Fatigue administration exclusions
  • Chain of duty commitments

 

Right at the centre of the laws for fatigue management, is a primary duty – a driver must not drive a fatigue-regulated heavy vehicle on a road while impaired by fatigue.  Drivers must be aware they may be impaired by fatigue even when complying with work and rest limits.

 

In the second part of this series we will explore the Fatigue Management Exceptions.

 

Drowsy driving and fatigue driving can lead you to your worst nightmare. It can lead to fatal accidents. Around 20% of fatal road accidents involve driver fatigue.

Here are some tips on how to reduce or overcome fatigue and drowsiness by following these simple yet effective steps in your daily routine:

 

  1. Get enough sleep

Make sure to have enough sleep before driving. It is not easy to tell that you are too tired to drive, so know when to pull over and get that power nap. Signs can be daydreaming, repeated yawning, troubling keeping your head up, drifting from lane, heavy eyelids.

 

  1. Take breaks

If you feel like you need a break do it! Breaks you’ll still get you where you are heading. Pull over to the nearest gas station or rest stop. It is better to take a break than risk your life while driving drowsy.

 

  1. Avoid alcohol and medications

Don’t do drunk driving, that is even worse than drowsy driving. Make sure not to drink liquor when you know that you’re about to drive. Always check your medications and take “non-drowsy” ones, that won’t affect your focus while driving.

 

  1. Right meal for a long drive

Truck drivers tend to forget to eat on time when driving, if they do have a break unhealthy foods are common and are fast. It would be nice to snack on food that are high in fibre such as oats, broccoli, avocados and beans, fibre rich foods can leave you feeling fuller and are mostly low in calories and fat. For lunch and dinner grilled chicken breast with mixed greens are constantly great as they help fill your stomach yet can be low in calories and fat. Lastly drink lots of water, just be ready for a toilet break.

 

  1. Workout Daily

It doesn’t mean that you need to go to the gym daily. Before heading out just do a ten-minute walk or jog around or follow this simple workout steps https://www.burleighdrivertraining.com.au/truck-driving-licence-qld/

 

Alertness, awareness, self-discipline and focus are the basic keys on how to keep you from accidents. Tips are just ways on how to make your driving more convenient and hassle free. Keep in mind that safety is always a priority and be a responsible driver. Want to be notified when the next part in this series is available and other related posts?  Follow us on our Facebook page for more news https://www.facebook.com/BurleighDriverTrainingSchool/ or contact us through phone
(07) 5527 3719.

Skills That a Truck Driver Must Have

Skills That a Truck Driver Must Have Burleigh Driver Training School

Skills That a Truck Driver Must Have

Do you have what it
takes to become a professional truck driver?

Being a truck driver requires tremendous skills and strength to perform your duties well. These skills cannot be acquired overnight. You need to exert utmost effort to become a competent truck driver. People who really wanted to be part of a driving industry obtain a training from a driving school.

The career of a truck driver is very interesting and rewarding. There are a lot of reasons why a truck driver is considered as a good profession.  Previously, Burleigh Driver Training School listed some of the benefits of being a professional driver. Great pay is given to drivers who have spent a good few years driving on the road. Extensive training is also provided as you need to pass a truck licence test.

Some companies are looking for applicants who possess a commendable driving experience. While other corporate industries consider skills more than experience.

Now if you’re ready to become a trucker, here are the following skills that you need to have:

 

  1. Being Independent

You should have the ability to work on your own. This job requires you to be independent as you’re responsible for transferring goods without the help of other people. There are a number of driving roles that require to work at night. There are also some instances where you have to deal with difficult situations. This may include; engine problems, damaged tires, and wheels, or a dragging clutch. That’s why it’s very important that you know how to operate various trucks. Motivating yourself can be a great help to stay awake and accomplish your tasks effectively.

 

  1. Cares About The Safety

Drivers should care about his loads and delivery. You should be able to carry and deliver the goods properly. That way, you can earn the trust of your employer because you’re able to transport the products on time and maintain its quality. Conduct a pre-vehicle inspection to avoid unnecessary delay of delivery. Post-Trip Inspection is also needed to know if there’s any defect in your vehicle. Being pro-active is one of the qualities that trucking companies look for a driver.

One of the ways to secure your safety is by having a truck licence training from an accredited driving school. You will learn different road rules and regulations of your current State. You will also know the safe following distance to prevent any accidents. Always remember, roads have a diverse size. That’s why you need to be prepared in any road conditions.

 

  1. Keen With Details and Records

You must know how to keep records such as receipt, invoice, log books and any transactions made during the time of the delivery. All the logs should fill out correctly to prevent any conflict with the regulators. Your job will be done accordingly and effectively by following this. You can also get a good impression from your company because of your good deeds.

 

  1. Physically and Mentally Fit

You are responsible for loading and unloading the truck that’s why you have to be physically and mentally fit. Part of your task is to carry heavy products so maintaining a good posture can vastly help you perform well. To be mentally fit, you have to leave your personal problems at home so you won’t get distracted. You are capable of making quick decisions which are vital, especially when driving.

 

  1. Excellent Communication Skills

Good communication skill are like oil that keeps your tasks running smoothly. Since you’re representing your company each time you do the transport, it is essential that you have this skill. You have to transmit correct information to avoid any confusion. Answering phone calls can be part of your task so you have to speak in a nice way. Avoid being rude as it can give a bad impression to the company you work for. You also need to have an interpersonal skills because you will be meeting a lot of people inside and outside the office. You can start building a harmonious working relationship by doing so.

 

  1. Knowledge in Mechanical Work

As a driver, you are going to spend long hours driving on the road. Sometimes, trucks are being overused so you cannot prevent any defects. You must know how to do some maintenance repair. You can save a lot of time and your job won’t be compromised.

To know numerous safety driving standards, some truckers are obtaining a lesson from a driving school. Aside from getting a Medium Rigid Truck Licence, or a Heavy Rigid Truck Licence, they will learn helpful lesson and tips to meet the truck compliance. A truck licence training will also give you a thorough understanding of each truck that you will operate.

For the aspiring truck drivers, obtaining these skills can make you feel more confident individually and professionally. Hope these following tips can work to your advantage. We are wishing you the best of luck in your driving career.

Winning the School Mum Challenge

 

 

How to Drive Safely in School Zones by Burleigh Driver Training School

 

Winning the School Mum Challenge by Burleigh Driver Training School

Do you feel anxious when you hear the bell of the school year?

It only means that a lot of changes may happen on the road.

The massive amount of traffic during pick up times and drop off, combined with possible road hazards can really add up to the stress that truck drivers may feel.

Burleigh Driver Training School has prepared some ways to avoid hitting a child while driving:

       Reduce Driving Speed

  • According to the NSW Department of Education, speed limits near or within school zone area should be reduced to 40km/h, between 8am to 9:30am and 2:30pm to 4pm.
  • Truck drivers should follow traffic rules and speed limit to avoid vehicle collision.
  • It will also give you enough time to stop when a kid is crossing the highway.

    Avoid Any Distractions

  •  Always keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes scanning the road.
  •  Avoid any distractions such as loud music, or using your mobile phones.

     Expect Heavy Traffic

  • When passing school zone, you must expect large traffic volume as parents are sending their children to school as early as seven in the morning.
  •  Traffic congestion usually occurs at around 4pm.
  •  To avoid a delay in your delivery, allow for increase travel time.

    Be Aware of Cyclists

    Truck drivers should be aware of different road hazards. This means:

  •  Look out for cyclists at all times. You will see them coming from different driveways as well as riding along the road so you have to stay alert.
  •  On a road with a 60 kph speed limit, you must leave a 1 meter space.
  •  On a road with a speed limit above 60 kph, you must leave a 1.5-meter space between your truck vehicle and the cyclist.
  •  Keep scanning your side mirrors to see cyclists around you.

    Obey Traffic Laws

  •  Sometimes, truck drivers are in a rush to deliver their goods on time. This is not an excuse to disobey school zone traffic signs.
  •  Following road signs will help you reduce the chance of getting into an accident.This Infographic presentation was designed to help you drive safely in a congested area like a school zone.
  • Burleigh Driver Training School wants to remind everyone to stay vigilant and keep these helpful tips in mind.Take it easy, drivers!  

 

Is there a Life after a DUI?

Driving School Queensland

 

Is there a life after a DUI?

‘Don’t Drink and Die.’ Ooopss or should we say ‘Don’t Drink and Drive.’

Approximately 30% of fatal crashes in Australia are caused by drink driving. According to the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety Queensland, over 1 in 4 drivers and riders killed on Australian roads have a BAC exceeding the legal limit.

In case you do not know the four alcohol limits in Queensland, our Driving School Queensland will walk you through it. These said limits are being used to apply penalties when you are caught driving under the influence of an illegal blood or breath alcohol concentration (BAC) for your licence.

Here are the four alcohol limits:

 

  1. Zero alcohol limit:

    If the alcohol concentration in your breath or blood is more than zero, you will be over this limit. This is the limit that applies when driving a truck or on your P’s. Drivers must have a zero-alcohol content.

  2. General alcohol limit:

    If the alcohol concentration in your breath or blood is equal to or more than 0.05, you will be over this limit. This limit is for cars, and open licence holders.

  3. Middle alcohol limit:

    If the alcohol concentration in your breath or blood is equal to or more than 0.10, you will be over this limit.

  4. High alcohol limit: 

    If the alcohol concentration in your breath or blood is equal to or more than 0.15, you will be over this limit.

    There are many campaigns about the bad effects of drunk driving. Alcohol is considered to be a drug depressant as it impairs your vision and slows down the activity of your central nervous system causing your brain to be sluggish.

    Being a truck driver requires extreme focus and alertness because they usually spend long stretches of time driving on their own. They have the sole responsibility for assuring the safety of their vehicles and the people they share the road with.

    So how does alcohol affect driving?

    Burleigh Driver Training School listed several effects of BAC whilst driving:

    • Slowing down your reaction time and affecting your ability to make right decisions.

     

    • You will find it hard driving on various road conditions such as straight line, curve line and road under construction. It will also reduce your ability to notice road hazards.

     

    • Previously, our Driving School Queensland emphasized that drunk driving causes a higher risk of vehicular accident as it reduces your attention span. Thus, you won’t be able to notice other drivers or vehicles.

     

    • If you are planning to upgrade your licence and look for a better paying job, the DUI that was charged to you will surely affect your future employment.

     

    • Expect some penalties when caught driving under the influence of alcohol. The penalty will depend on your alcohol intake and your BAC history.

     

    • Since your vision is affected, you will find it hard to obey road rules.

     

    • It can affect your psychomotor skills causing confusion and poor vehicle coordination.

     

    • Drunk drivers are more prone to road accidents, thus causing emotional distress and long-time effects to the victims.

     

    • DUI resonates financial loss. Fines and penalties are the immediate impacts.

     

    • In worst cases, drunk driving can cause physical impairment and death.

    So if you are still wondering that drunk driving has an effect to everyone? Our Driving School Queensland will definitely say ‘YES’ to this.

    You should never risk driving under the influence of alcohol. Stay Safe, Drivers!

    This Infographic presentation was designed to remind every driver about the bad effects of drunk driving.

    Burleigh Driver Training School cares about your safety.

    Do you know some tips on how to avoid drunk driving? Share your comments below.

    TAGS: Truck Driver, Heavy Rigid Licence, Alcohol Limits for Driving

 

 

 

 

Want a truck licence or a licence upgrade? Get yours here!